Culturable Endophytes Associated with Soybean Seeds and Their Potential for Suppressing Seed-Borne Pathogens

Authors

  • Jiwon Kim1, Mehwish Roy1, Sung-Ho Ahn2, Gnanendra Shanmugam1, Ji Sun Yang3, Ho Won Jung3, Junhyun Jeon1,4,*

Keywords:

antagonistic activity, crop protection, seed-borne disease, seed-borne pathogen, seed endophyte

Abstract

Seed-borne pathogens in crops reduce the seed germination rate and hamper seedling growth, leading to significant yield loss. Due to the growing concerns about environmental damage and the development of resistance to agrochemicals among pathogen populations, there is a strong demand for eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic chemicals in agriculture. It has been well established during the last few decades that plant seeds harbor diverse microbes, some of which are vertically transmitted and important for plant health and productivity. In this study, we isolated culturable endophytic bacteria and fungi from soybean seeds and evaluated their antagonistic activities against common bacterial and fungal seed-borne pathogens of soybean. A total of 87 bacterial isolates and 66 fungal isolates were obtained. Sequencing of 16S rDNA and internal transcribed spacer amplicon showed that these isolates correspond to 30 and 15 different species of bacteria and fungi, respectively. Our antibacterial and antifungal activity assay showed that four fungal species and nine bacterial species have the potential to suppress the growth of at least one seed-borne pathogen tested in the study. Among them, Pseudomonas koreensis appears to have strong antagonistic activities across all the pathogens. Our collection of soybean seed endophytes would be a valuable resource not only for studying biology and ecology of seed endophytes but also for practical deployment of seed endophytes toward crop protection.

 

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Published

2022-09-06

How to Cite

Jiwon Kim1, Mehwish Roy1, Sung-Ho Ahn2, Gnanendra Shanmugam1, Ji Sun Yang3, Ho Won Jung3, Junhyun Jeon1,4,*. (2022). Culturable Endophytes Associated with Soybean Seeds and Their Potential for Suppressing Seed-Borne Pathogens. The Plant Pathology Journal, 38(4), 313–322. Retrieved from https://ppj-online.org/index.php/PPJ/article/view/1027

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